New Year; New Beginning

Let Us Begin

 

Matthew R. Smalls, Esq., Senior Vice President

Matthew R. Smalls, Esq., Senior Vice President

2017 marks the start of my new adventure.  The MirRam Group (http://www.MirRamGroup.com) has named me Senior Vice President.  In this role, I will manage the Albany office, which focuses on New York State government relations. 

This is an amazing opportunity.  The MirRam Group is a premiere boutique organization.  Founded in 2000, by former New York State Assembly Member Roberto Ramirez, and former Chairman of the Board of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation Luis A. Miranda Jr.

MirRam is highly respected as an ethical, effective firm.  And, importantly, they are a close-knit family.  I am honored to be welcomed into the family.  And, I pledge to work hard and make my family proud.

 

DA: Black Boy is a A Predator

Today, a Manhattan prosecutor called a 17 year old kid a “predator” in court.  The kid was accused of standing by while his 16 year old friend stole a man’s phone on the subway.  The prosecutor the told the judge that the kid deserves a criminal record for the rest of his life, as well as 3 – 6 years in state prison.  A Predator.  This young man had family in court supporting him.  His dad works full time, and listened to the proceedings through the assistance of an English/Spanish translation device.  The young man was a senior in high school.  He has never been in any kind of trouble before.  He was taking the subway to his part-time job at a recycling plant in New Jersey.  A predator.  Deserving of 3 – 6 years in prison.  17 years old.

Remarks like this cut me to the core.  The prosecutor sees nothing of that boy but a case file.  He is not a kid.  He is not a teenager.  He is not a high school student.   The DA sees him as a violent being who deserves a cage.  Barely human…. A Predator.

 

Stories from Criminal Court

Friday Night in Manhattan.....

For many New Yorkers, Friday night can be magical.  Food, wine, dancing..... thousands of pleasures and pursuits await us. 

Not the Public Defenders.

Tonight, I am in Manhattan Criminal Court.  As an "on duty" public defender, I am in court representing people who have been charged with felonies and misdemeanors of all kinds.  Here, in the heat and humidity, a judge presides as people stand accused of robbery, narcotics, and other forms of mayhem.  My job is to fight tooth and nail for each and every client's release.  I have to pull at the strands of allegations that support the charges filed against my clients.  And if I pull hard enough, and skillfully enough, the charges can begin to unravel, and my clients will go free.